Basic Deviled Eggs

6:30:00 PM

Deviled eggs are the perfect side dish or appetizer for a summer get together. They are relatively simple, cheap, and they can be made ahead of time.

If you look for deviled eggs on the internet, you are going to find a wide variety of recipes. Wasabi deviled eggs, bacon deviled eggs, avocado deviled eggs, and spinach deviled eggs all showed up when I just did a 30 second search on pinterest.Those are all interesting variations on a theme. But it's not what I think of when I think of deviled eggs.


Deviled eggs bring me back to my Grandma's kitchen.When I was a little girl, it wasn't unusual that when we were in town that a good portion of the extended family would manage to cram into my Grandma and Granddaddy's house for a Sunday dinner after church. I can remember watching my aunt or my mom sit down at a end of the table to mix up a batch of deviled eggs while my Grandma was mixing up biscuits (which, by the way, was why I was in there in the first place, to beg for some biscuit dough--but that's another story!). Anyway, even in my family, there are variations on the basic deviled egg recipe. My mom doesn't like as much mustard in her eggs as my aunt does. But those are minor variations on a basic recipe.



A few years ago I was trying to figure out a side for a monthly get together that some friend of ours do. I decided to try my hands at deviled eggs. I checked with my mom what the basic proportions were, and like most recipes that come out of a grandma's kitchen, the recipe was fairly loose. Basically, you have to work at the recipe until...well, until it just tastes right. This is the first time I've written down exactly how I make deviled eggs. They are closer to my mom's version of the eggs than my aunt's, but if you are looking for a basic recipe for deviled eggs from which to develop your own version, try this one.





I have seen on pinterest at the Burlap Bag how you can bake "hard boiled" eggs, so this time I tried it--and it worked pretty well. Basically, I put the eggs in a 325 oven fo30 minutes. Keep in mind you may get little brown spots on the white where the egg touches the muffin pan, but it didn't affect the taste--you just have to work around it for aesthetic reasons!



Basic Deviled Eggs

10 eggs, hardboiled
3 tbsp mayonnaise
1 tbsp mustard
Salt and pepper to taste

Peel the eggs and cut them in half lengthwise.


Take out all the yolks and put them in a small mixing bowl. If you have a helper, have them smash up those yolks with a spoon or fork.


Add the mayonnaise and mustard. Mix. Add the salt and pepper to taste. Mix again.


I've experimented a bunch on ways to get the yolk mixture into the egg whites, and this method has proved the easiest. Put the yolk mixture on a tablespoon and push it off with a teaspoon, like so:


And that's it, pretty easy, don't you think? Now you can put some fancy stuff in them if you want, or you can just have the basic eggs. I keep doing the basic eggs, though.



All I know is that it is a rare gathering that I have any leftovers to take home. If I choose not to make them, I always have someone ask me why. In fact, the last time I made them, one of the guys went through the line a little too late and missed out. I have also had an offer to buy me a much larger deviled egg dish so that there are more to go around. I hope you enjoy this recipe nearly as much as my friends do.




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10 comments

  1. This looks yummy! I love the tutorial. :) Found you on the Positively Splendid blog hop!

    Jess @ The Delightful Crafter

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  2. Basic yes and everyones is different..my snl likes to think because she adds sugar her's is best ha...I never leave a "get-to-gather" with any left overs. My recipe is basically like yours but I add onions pickles chopped really fine and paprika on top.

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    1. I have never heard of sugar in deviled eggs! How much does she put in it? Thanks for posting your variation, I might try that too!

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  3. I've just started making deviled eggs, too. It's one of the few things my mom would make, so I knew it couldn't be that hard (no offense intended to my mom, it's just how she is with cooking). Your oven method is interesting. I recently discovered steaming the eggs, which takes a little longer (20 minutes of solid steaming), but makes the eggs infinitely easier to peel! While this doesn't affect the taste, it sure affects my attitude! :)Nice egg-y pics, too!

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    1. What's the technique with steaming? Does it involve a steamer basket? I've never heard of this. Sounds intriguing. The baking helps some with peeling, but leaves little brown marks on the egg whites. Does steaming do that, too?

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  4. Hi! Visiting from a link party. I love deviled eggs.. and this is exactly how I make them! I sprinkle some paprika on them but everything else is the same. So I know these are delicious! :)

    If you get a chance I would love for you to link this up to my Friday party.. it just opened!

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  5. I use your basic recipe and agree, deviled eggs are ideal to take to a potluck because you can count on bringing home an empty dish. For others who boil eggs, the secret to shelling them easily I've found is run cold water on them directly they come off the stove, then I dump a tray of ice cubes in the pot too. The quick cooling down seems to do the trick.

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    1. Thanks for the tip Michele! I wonder if I bake them then throw them in ice water it would work the same way? I think I'm going to try it!

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  6. I add 2 tbsp. of salt to the boiling water before adding the eggs. And it always makes them easier to peel. Never heard of baking them. Might have to try it one day!

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  7. Thank you. This is exactly what I have been looking for! Basic and simple, just the way I like it. :D I, too, did the Pinterest search and found all kinds of interesting variations, (which I may try at some point) but right now I wanted fast and simple.

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